How to Make Money As A Kid? Moziah Bridges Started A $150k Bow Ties Business at 12

Who Moziah Bridges is and how to be an entrepreneur as a kid


Moziah Bridges is one of the most amazing kids I have ever read about. Currently, he is the CEO and the founder of Mo’s Bows and he is just 12 years old. This little entrepreneur started his bow ties selling the business when he was just 9 when he came up with the business idea. He found out that there were no places, where cool and interesting bow ties could be bought. Nobody was selling such and this problem actually was seen as an awesome business opportunity by Moziah. Why? Because he had a solution for it…, he could supply this demand! thinking like a real entrepreneur, he started surrounding himself with the right people that would help him achieve his goal. That included his grandma quickly involved in all of this and they both started manufacturing bow ties from useless materials.

Mo’s Bows was started in Memphis, back in 2011. The company has reached $150 000 in sales and it’s currently growing more. His business became viral, because of the curious story and the interesting and impressive founder it has. Moziah’s story started spreading around like a plague, from the popular show ‘Shark Tank’ to many big TV shows and sites. His company has even employed 5 people, two of them are his grandmother (she is around 80) and his mother. And they re just gaining momentum now.



mos-bows

Moziah Bridges – Mo’s Bows

“I like to wear bow ties because they make me look good and feel good.” One of the young entrepreneur’s main objectives is to make the world a better and more fun place. Well, he has definitely started doing this with the amazing ties his business sells. And on top of that, he even makes some decent money to support his family. Pretty nice!

Moziah Bridges has just started his business career. Even though he is just 12, he is already the CEO of a successful business. The kid is also a philanthropist at an early age. As he shared on his blog, in the summer of 2014 he donated $1600 to Glenview Summer Camp, giving 10 kids the opportunity to go and enjoy the camp. I wish him luck and I hope I write many more interesting stories about him in the future here.

So how to make money as a kid? Well, why not start a business? If you liked the post, please consider sharing it with friends, sharing is caring, you know… I believe you may enjoy many of our other posts, you could give some of them a shot, we prepared a list of them below.

Aside from Mo’s Bows success in fashion, Bridges is committed to inspiring other aspiring entrepreneurs like himself. He works with underserved youth through programs like Junction 44 which brings arts and business classes to Memphis elementary schools and inspires young creatives. As one of Fortune’s Powerful Teens 2020 list recipients, he serves as a role model for so many growing up in entrepreneurial environments across America.

Kids Entrepreneurs

Entrepreneurship is no longer just reserved for adults – there has been an explosion of young entrepreneurs rising to the top ranks in recent years. From teenagers running multi-million dollar businesses to kids taking initiative with startup ideas of their own, it would seem that children have begun to embrace the entrepreneurial spirit.

Six-year-old John Quincy started his own lemonade stand when his parents refused to buy him a pet rabbit. Quinn Callander, aged 8, broke into his local market by selling his self–designed food can prevention locks to protect against foreign objects in cans. Twelve-year–old Sophia Hatzis runs an environmentally friendly jewelry business using recycled materials.

With these inspiring youth-led entrepreneur stories, the question arises – why are children engaging in entrepreneurial activities? One answer is that younger generations are growing up with greater access to resources and technology that older generations didn’t have when starting businesses. Children are exposed to business from an early age, making it easier for them to understand how businesses operate and plan out strategies for success than earlier generations.

When children succeed in business endeavors, like the young entrepreneurs discussed above, it often sets an example for those around them. Entrepreneurship requires passion and ambition resources this generation of young people seem willing to tap into in order to prove themselves and make something of their lives.

When children succeed in business endeavors, like the young entrepreneurs discussed above, it often sets an example for those around them. Entrepreneurship requires passion and ambition – resources this generation of young people seem willing to tap into in order to prove themselves and make something of their lives.